World Events

COP21: Seeing the invisible

The outcome of COP21 extends well beyond national governments and those with a seat at the table at the events themselves. This is about people around the world ‘getting it’ including staff in companies, the data crunchers who analyse the impact of changing CO2 levels and the person on the street feeling informed enough to make the difference through their domestic choices.

In the dark

Earth Hour launched in Sydney in 2007 with backing from the city’s mayor. Inspired by this, San Francisco held "Lights Out" a few moths later. By 2008 there was participation from all continents with many landmark buildings around the world turning off non-essential lighting including the Sydney Opera House and the Empire State Building and participation has continued to increase year on year. In 2009, The United Nations observed Earth Hour at its Headquarters in New York and at other UN facilities around the world including the UN Environment Programme (UNEP) offices in Nairobi, Kenya.

There's a lot resting on Lima: The 2 degrees challenge

There is a clear aim for leaders this December at Lima. But the reality is that this is a shared challenge. Every person, company, organisation on this planet needs to see this challenge and relate world emissions, to temperature rises and their own potential to contribute to the solution

World fossil fuel use, carbon emissions & CCS

The opportunity to create a film to show the world’s CO2 emissions in real-time has been a long-held dream. We wondered if this was the moment when we were approached by WBCSD to make a film to show the necessity of Carbon Capture & Storage (CCS).

Our film would have to clearly articulate the role of CCS in keeping global warming below 2° C threshold, as well as showing that renewables, though growing fast, are not growing as fast as global energy demand. We would also need an introduction to the scale of the problem in terms of global fossil fuel usage and of course carbon emissions!

World Cup Carbon Emissions

Some offices organise a sweepstake for the World Cup. However, perhaps predictably (unlike the semi-final on Tuesday) we got interested in the associated emissions of this occasion. We started to think – what would the carbon story of a global event like this look like? Luckily we could turn to FIFA's own comprehensive calculations document to find out.

What the EPA reduction plan looks like

Under President Obama’s Climate Action Plan, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) proposes a 30% reduction in carbon pollution from power plants by 2030. But the numbers are big. And we wanted to show the actual volume of CO2 saved in a way that everyone can understand.